Philippine Tanks and Armored Cars
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Philippine Tanks and Armored Cars

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  1. #1
    C.I.A. Deadstring67's Avatar
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    Default Philippine Tanks and Armored Cars


    ACV 300











    ACV-300 is the designation of a vehicle family developed by the Turkish defense company FNSS, containing an infantry fighting vehicle (IFV) and an armoured personnel carrier (APC). The ACV-300 is based on the American Advanced Infantry Fighting Vehicle, which is based on the chassis of the M113 armored personnel carrier. It is currently in service with the armed forces of Turkey, Malaysia, the Philippines, and the United Arab Emirates.

    History

    FNSS developed the ACV-300 based on the AIFV to meet the Turkish Land Forces Command's (TLFC's) operational requirement. The first production vehicles were delivered in 1992. The basic AIFV has a one-person power-operated turret armed with a 25mm cannon and 7.62mm co-axial machine gun. FNSS Defense Systems' latest development is the Armored Combat Vehicle - New Generation which has an additional roadwheel each side. This can undertake a wider range of battlefield missions as it has greater internal volume and load-carrying capability. The vehicle is fully amphibious, propelled in the water by its tracks. Standard equipment includes passive night vision equipment, an NBC (nuclear, biological, chemical) protection system and smoke grenade launchers.

    The AIFV is in service with Turkey 2249 and the United Arab Emirates (136 delivered). Malaysia has ordered 211 ACV-300 in different versions in 2000, all of which have been delivered.
    The Malaysian version of the AIFV is a result of a collaboration between FNSS and the Malaysian company DRB-Hicom Defence Technologies (Deftech). Malaysia's ACV-300 tanks are nicknamed the Adnan, after Adnan bin Saidi, a Malay Lieutenant who fought in the Battle of Singapore during World War II. They are manufactured locally at Pekan in Pahang.
    The ACV-300 can be fitted with a number of turret choices to tailor to individual customer requirements. They are also equipped with firing ports, which allows infantrymen to fire their weapons from within the vehicle.

    The Adnans feature KVH TacNav navigation system incorporating GPS, LWD Avimo laser warning device, Wegmann type 76mm grenade launchers, NBC filtration system and ANVVS-2 night vision system.

    The Philippines acquired six (6) ACV-300s for the Philippine Army and delivered in November 2009. One (1) ARV was purchased in 2004. More units to follow, although the number is still vague.

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  3. #2
    C.I.A. Deadstring67's Avatar
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    Default Re: Philippine Tanks and Armored Cars

    Post sad mo mga bro.

    Must have

    Pictures (taken in the Philippines)

    Details

  4. #3
    C.I.A. Deadstring67's Avatar
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    Default Re: Philippine Tanks and Armored Cars

    AIFV









    The AIFV (Armored Infantry Fighting Vehicle) is a tracked light armored vehicle which serves as an infantry fighting vehicle (IFV) in the armies of several countries. It is a development of the M113A1 armored personnel carrier.

    History

    In 1967, funded by the U.S. Army, the FMC corporation produced two prototype vehicles designated as XM765, based on their experiences earlier XM701 vehicle, developed for the MICV-65 program. The XM765 was based on the M113A1, upgraded with an enclosed turret and firing ports, so that the infantry could fight from within the vehicle. The Army evaluated the vehicle, but decided that they wanted a better protected and more mobile vehicle,[1] selecting instead the M2 Bradley.
    FMC continued development as a private venture resulting in the product improved (PI) M113A1 in 1970. The PI M113A1 had the driver and engine at the front, with an enclosed weapon station in the center of the hull and the commander seated at the rear. This arrangement meant that the commander had a very poor forward view. FMC went back to the drawing board and came up with a new design, that had the driver on the front left of the hull, with the commander seated behind him. To the right of the commander was a one man turret. The vehicle would later be designated the AIFV (armored infantry fighting vehicle).
    While the US was uninterested in the design, a number of other governments were interested in the vehicle, which was simpler, lighter, and cheaper than the Bradley. After a series of demonstrations and the delivery of four evaluation vehicles in 1974, the Netherlands government placed an order for 880 of the vehicles in 1975, which were designated YPR-765 when they entered service. Some changes were made at the request of the Dutch government including shifting the weapon station to the right side and moving the commander behind the driver. In total the Netherlands ordered 2,079 of which 815 were produced locally under license. Under the YPR-2000 program, virtually all Dutch vehicles were upgraded to YPR-765A1 standard that is easily identified by the 3-tone NATO camouflage pattern. During the war in Afghanistan, several vehicles were fitted with additional armour.
    The Philippines also received 45 vehicles in 1979, these were intended to take 25mm cannons, although some were later modified to fit 12.7mm machine guns.
    In 1979 Belgium placed an order for 514 AIFV-B to be produced locally along with 525 M113A-B (similar to the M113A2). The first vehicles were delivered in 1982.
    Turkey selected the AIFV in 1989 after a competition involving the Alvis Vickers Warrior IFV and United Defense LP Armoured Infantry Fighting Vehicle. The total value of the contract for 1,698 vehicles was US$1.076 billion. The first 285 hulls were produced in Belgium, the remaining vehicles were produced entirely in Turkey. A little way into the production run, with 200 vehicles completed the Turkish AIFV specification was updated to include a more powerful power pack developing 300 horsepower, an Allison X-200-4 transmission and hydrostatic steering from the M113A3. During the production run a number of changes were made to the armament of the vehicle including different turret packages, and power packs.

    Description (per Dutch variant)
    The hull of the vehicle is made of welded aluminum with spaced steel laminate armor bolted onto the side and front. The voids of the armor are filled with polyurethane foam, which gives the vehicle extra buoyancy when travelling in the water.
    The engine sits on the front right of the hull, behind a hatch which can used to remove the complete powerpack. The powerpack is similar to the M113A1, except for a larger radiator capacity and turbocharger. The transmission is also fitted with heavy duty components from the M548 tracked cargo carrier. Immediately to the left of the engine is the driver, above whom is a hatch that opens to the right. The driver has four M27 day periscopes. The drivers center periscope can be replaced by a passive infra-red periscope for night driving. The commander sits immediately behind the driver, and has a cupola which can be completely traversed. The cupola has five periscopes, four of which are M17 day periscopes, the fifth has 1x to 6x variable magnification.
    The turret is fitted on the right side of the hull behind the engine. The turret has electro-hydraulic traverse and can elevate from -10 to +50 and can traverse and elevate at a speed of 60/sec. The turret mounts an Oerlikon Contraves 25 mm KBA-B02 cannon with a dual ammunition feed, mounted to the left is a 7.62 mm FN MAG machine gun. 180 rounds of 25 mm are ready to use, with another 144 rounds stored in the hull. The coaxial gun has 230 rounds ready with a further 1,610 stored in the hull.
    The troop compartment is at the rear of the hull, a large power operated ramp allows access through the rear of the vehicle, a door is also provided in the ramp. Additionally a single piece hatch covers the top of the troop compartment. The compartment contains seven troops in the Dutch variant with six sitting back to back facing outwards, and a single troop sitting between the command and the turret facing backwards. There are two firing ports in each side of the hull and a single firing port in the rear. The side firing ports are provided with M17 periscopes, the rear one is fitted with an M27 periscope.

    Philippine Army, 85 vehicles (including 6 armored recovery vehicles), many armed with 25 mm cannons, received from the United States, and a single Armored Recovery Vehicle (ARV) received from FNSS of Turkey in 2004

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    Default Re: Philippine Tanks and Armored Cars

    nice info bay..thanks

  6. #5
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    Default Re: Philippine Tanks and Armored Cars

    kuwang pana bro... dghan pa kulang... post sad nya mo...

  7. #6
    C.I.A. joshua259's Avatar
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    Default Re: Philippine Tanks and Armored Cars

    this is best suited in open rugged terrain.... but still effective in urban area's. the only downside of this carrier is that it is slow and makes loud noises. by its presence it will alert any nearby enemy forces of its coming but will tremble when they know this tank will roll in to there block. not gonna lie when that 25 mic-mic opens fire it will tear everything apart. and with the uranium bullets any tank, no matter how thick the armor can be, will tear it apart.

  8. #7
    C.I.A. elvandesantos's Avatar
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    Default Re: Philippine Tanks and Armored Cars

    GKN Simba APC (please note that this are not a tank, its rather called apc)



    Simba APC with standard one man .50 caliber MG turret. The Simba 4X4 APC was developed by GKN as a private venture and was adopted by the Philippines as it's new wheeled APC. A total of 150 were ordered with most being assembled from kits in Subic. Total cost of the deal was $46 million. GKN supplies many of the armored infantry vehicles used by the British Army, such as the Warrior MICV, the FV432 APC and the Saxon wheeled 4X4 APC. GKN has since merged with Alvis, the producers of the Scorpion series of light tanks and other armored vehicles.

    PA Simbas are normally armed with the .50 caliber MG turret and are also sometimes seen with a pintle-mounted 40 mm automatic grenade launcher from CIS of Singapore.

    Only the Philippines uses the Simba, though Malaysia did mention a passing interest in it at one point.

    also please note that this APC's are airconditioned compared to other APC's we have.
    Last edited by elvandesantos; 04-10-2011 at 08:57 PM.

  9. #8
    C.I.A. elvandesantos's Avatar
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    Default Re: Philippine Tanks and Armored Cars

    1meter turret


    m113 with .50cal


    M113 with a Scorpion turret




    M113 APC

    M113 with Cadillac Gage (now Textron) Most M113s in the Philippine Army have the old armored ring-mounted .50 cal MG. The PA also uses M113s mounting surplus Scorpion tank turrets as fire support vehicles.

    The M113 series of armored vehicles is the most widely produced vehicle of its type. As of 1999 over 76,000 units of all variants have been produced. The first vehicle was completed in 1960 and it is still in production. There are too many variants to list. The latest model is the M113A3 which introduces several improvements such as a more powerful engine, spall liners, external fuel tanks and optional applique/standoff armor. Standofff armor provides extra protection from HEAT rounds (such as an RPG) by detonating the charge far enough away from the actual armor for the explosive gas jet to have its desired effect. Several upgrade packages are available for countries with existing M113 fleets.

    At least 100 M113s are targeted for upgrading with the AFP's modernization program.
    Last edited by elvandesantos; 04-10-2011 at 08:50 PM.

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    Default Re: Philippine Tanks and Armored Cars

    post bro unsay latest run.. kay murag puro man jud 2nd hand or karaan ang mga tanke sa pinas oi!! hahah!

  11. #10
    C.I.A. elvandesantos's Avatar
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    Default Re: Philippine Tanks and Armored Cars

    Quote Originally Posted by botoy0917 View Post
    post bro unsay latest run.. kay murag puro man jud 2nd hand or karaan ang mga tanke sa pinas oi!! hahah!
    the ACV300 is the latest bro. and commonly used in many armies in other nations.. anyway its not the age of the vehicle is important but rather the effectiveness in battle.

    and you think abram tanks in the US is what? 5-10years old? it more than 20years old FYI lng. only its consistently updated.

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